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Florida

Page history last edited by Henry T. Hill 1 week, 3 days ago

What is not in Florida

 

Protest/riots in cities

None in Florida - See Wikipedia "2020-2022 United States racial unrest" and Wikipedia "List of incidents of civil unrest in the United States" from 1783 to 2021

Combatting-Violence-Protection-Act.pdf

 

Defund Police action in cities - Not allowed 

 

Crime

Collier County Sheriff Rambosk posted this at 12:00 noon Friday January 14, 2022


Sheriff Kevin Rambosk today praised the teamwork between multiple CCSO units that led to the swift apprehension of five teenagers in connection with a violent robbery and kidnapping incident Thursday.

The arrested individuals range in age from 15 to 18 and are each charged with armed robbery with a firearm and armed kidnapping. They are Luigi Roca, 18, of Ibis Club Drive; Anthony Zangrilli, 18, of Carrington Circle; Yankiel Borden, 15, of 44th St. S.W.; Yoni Borden, 15, of 44th St. S.W.; and Carlos Rodriguez, 16, of Golden Gate Blvd. W.

Sheriff Rambosk commended the collaborative effort by deputies and detectives from different departments across the agency.

“This was truly a team effort aimed at keeping our community safe,” Sheriff Rambosk said. “Five violent criminals are now off our streets.”

Collier County Sheriff’s Office reports gave this account of the events leading up to the arrests:

The teenage victim told detectives he was walking near his residence in East Naples around 1:30 p.m. Thursday when he was approached by a red four-door vehicle occupied by Roca, Rodriguez and the Borden brothers.

The victim said Roca, Rodriguez and the Bordens, who were all known to him, got out of the vehicle and dragged him inside, placing him in the backseat and putting a pillowcase over his head.

They drove the victim to Roca’s apartment where Zangrilli was waiting. The suspects beat the victim, told him he owed them money and used his cell phone to try to get the victim’s family members to send them money.

The victim said Roca, Zangrilli and Yankiel Borden each brandished a semi-automatic handgun with a laser at the apartment. The victim said Zangrilli pointed the firearm at him and threatened to kill him.

The victim told detectives one of the Borden twins gave him a green shirt or cloth to wipe the blood from his face from being beaten.

When it appeared the victim wasn’t going to be able to produce any money, the suspects drove him back to the intersection where they kidnapped him from, telling him they would kill his family if he contacted law enforcement.

Deputies arrested Roca and Rodriguez following a traffic stop and confiscated the red four-door Chevrolet Sonic they were traveling in.

SHOCAP deputies took the Borden brothers into custody. A review of Yoni Borden’s court-ordered GPS ankle monitor placed him in the vicinity of where the victim said he was kidnapped and at Roca’s apartment at the time the victim said he was there being beaten.

Detectives executed a search warrant at the suspect apartment where they found a blood-stained pillowcase and a green shirt with blood on it. The search also turned up a box of .380-caliber ammunition and a 40-caliber magazine for a Glock 27.

Zangrilli was present during the search and was taken into custody.

More charges may be pending as detectives said they are looking at all five of the suspects in connection with other crimes currently under investigation.

Sheriff Kevin Rambosk today praised the teamwork between multiple CCSO units that led to the swift apprehension of five teenagers in connection with a violent robbery and kidnapping incident Thursday.

The arrested individuals range in age from 15 to 18 and are each charged with armed robbery with a firearm and armed kidnapping. They are Luigi Roca, 18, of Ibis Club Drive; Anthony Zangrilli, 18, of Carrington Circle; Yankiel Borden, 15, of 44th St. S.W.; Yoni Borden, 15, of 44th St. S.W.; and Carlos Rodriguez, 16, of Golden Gate Blvd. W.

Sheriff Rambosk commended the collaborative effort by deputies and detectives from different departments across the agency.

“This was truly a team effort aimed at keeping our community safe,” Sheriff Rambosk said. “Five violent criminals are now off our streets.”

Collier County Sheriff’s Office reports gave this account of the events leading up to the arrests:

The teenage victim told detectives he was walking near his residence in East Naples around 1:30 p.m. Thursday when he was approached by a red four-door vehicle occupied by Roca, Rodriguez and the Borden brothers.

The victim said Roca, Rodriguez and the Bordens, who were all known to him, got out of the vehicle and dragged him inside, placing him in the backseat and putting a pillowcase over his head.

They drove the victim to Roca’s apartment where Zangrilli was waiting. The suspects beat the victim, told him he owed them money and used his cell phone to try to get the victim’s family members to send them money.

The victim said Roca, Zangrilli and Yankiel Borden each brandished a semi-automatic handgun with a laser at the apartment. The victim said Zangrilli pointed the firearm at him and threatened to kill him.

The victim told detectives one of the Borden twins gave him a green shirt or cloth to wipe the blood from his face from being beaten.

When it appeared the victim wasn’t going to be able to produce any money, the suspects drove him back to the intersection where they kidnapped him from, telling him they would kill his family if he contacted law enforcement.

Deputies arrested Roca and Rodriguez following a traffic stop and confiscated the red four-door Chevrolet Sonic they were traveling in.

SHOCAP deputies took the Borden brothers into custody. A review of Yoni Borden’s court-ordered GPS ankle monitor placed him in the vicinity of where the victim said he was kidnapped and at Roca’s apartment at the time the victim said he was there being beaten.

Detectives executed a search warrant at the suspect apartment where they found a blood-stained pillowcase and a green shirt with blood on it. The search also turned up a box of .380-caliber ammunition and a 40-caliber magazine for a Glock 27.

Zangrilli was present during the search and was taken into custody.

More charges may be pending as detectives said they are looking at all five of the suspects in connection with other crimes currently under investigation.

May be an image of 1 person

Yoni Borden= 15 years old

May be an image of 1 person

Anthony Zangrilli - 18 years old

May be an image of 1 person

Yankiel Borden - 15 years old

May be an image of 1 person

Luigi Roca - 18 years old

May be an image of 1 person

Carlos Rodriguez - 16 years old

 

Collier County Public Schools Programs:

New Beginnings (grades 1-8) similar to JROTC in Naples and Immokalee, Phoenix (alternative to expulsion program)  Naples and Immokalee, Teenage Parent Naples and Immokalee, Beacon High School Naples and Immokalee, Education Day Treatment works with David Lawrence Center (for secondary and over-aged students with emotional/behavioral disabilities),  Collier Juvenile Detention Center, Pace Center for Girls.

Mail Location Alternative Education Center, 3710 Estey Ave., Naples, FL 34104

1,729 students served 2020-2021 in 11 programs at 8 locations. An average of 900 students served daily 2019-2020. 307 students graduated who would have dropped out if not for Alternative Schools programs.  

 

Sanctuary Cities - In 2019, DeSantis signed a law prohibiting a local government entity from having a sanctuary policy. The law required county jails to enter into agreements with a federal immigration agency and do their best to support federal immigration law. Supporters of the bill said it would improve public safety.

 

Homeless - From Homeless Population by State 2021

California has 151,278 homeless with 39,613,493 population in 2021

New York has 92,091 homeless with 19,299,981 population in 2021

Florida has 28,328 homeless with 21,944,577 population in 2021

Texas has 25,848 homeless with 29,730,311 population 2021

Washington has 21,577 homeless  with 7,796,941 population 2021

Oregon has 15,876 homeless with 4,289,439 population 2021

 

Education in Florida

Florida's Board of Education banned "critical race theory" from public school classrooms 

Florida has 67 counties and 67 county school districts and has one school district for each of the four research schools and one school district for the deaf and blind and one school district for the virtual school and one school district for the youth development center. so Florida has 74 school districts. 

California has 941 school districts

New York has 940 school districts

Texas has 1,029 school districts

Washington has 322 school districts

Oregon has 197 school districts

 

Collier County has 70 schools for 47,834 students with 3,200 teachers. Collier County has a population of 398,304. Lee County with Fort Myers has a population of 802,791. 

Miami-Dade County has 550 schools with 350,000 students with 17,584 teachers (largest school district in Florida) Miami-Dade County has a population of  2,721,110.

 

117,108 school districts in 1939  with 226,762 total public schools in United States 

13,588 school districts in 2011 with 98,817 total public schools in United States

From Digest of Education Statistics

 

Florida Law Bans Critical Race Theory

6A-1.094124 Required Instruction Planning and Reporting. (3) As provided in Section 1003.42(2), F.S., members of instructional staff in public schools must teach the required instruction topics efficiently and faithfully, using materials that meet the highest standards of professionalism and historical accuracy.

 

(a) Efficient and faithful teaching of the required topics must be consistent with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and the Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking (B.E.S.T.) Standards.

 

b) Instruction on the required topics must be factual and objective, and may not suppress or distort significant historical events, such as the Holocaust, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the civil rights movement and the contributions of women, African American and Hispanic people to our country, as already provided in Section 1003.42(2), F.S. Examples of theories that distort historical events and are inconsistent with State Board approved standards include the denial or minimization of the Holocaust, and the teaching of Critical Race Theory, meaning the theory that racism is not merely the product of prejudice, but that racism is embedded in American society and its legal systems in order to uphold the supremacy of white persons. Instruction may not utilize material from the 1619 Project and may not define American history as something other than the creation of a new nation based largely on universal principles stated in the Declaration of Independence. Instruction must include the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments.

 

(c) Efficient and faithful teaching further means that any discussion is appropriate for the age and maturity level of the students, and teachers serve as facilitators for student discussion and do not share their personal views or attempt to indoctrinate or persuade students to a particular point of view that is inconsistent with the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and the Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking (B.E.S.T.) Standards.

From Florida Department of Education 

https://www.fldoe.org/core/fileparse.php/19958/urlt/7-4.pdf

 

Fairness in Women's Sports Act

Section 1006.205 - Fairness in Women's Sports Act

(1) SHORT TITLE.-This section may be cited as the "Fairness in Women's Sports Act."

 

(2) LEGISLATIVE INTENT AND FINDINGS.-

(a) It is the intent of the Legislature to maintain opportunities for female athletes to demonstrate their strength, skills, and athletic abilities and to provide them with opportunities to obtain recognition and accolades, college scholarships, and the numerous other long-term benefits that result from participating and competing in athletic endeavors.

(b) The Legislature finds that maintaining the fairness for women athletic opportunities is an important state interest. The Legislature finds that requiring the designation of separate sex-specific athletic teams or sports is necessary to maintain fairness for women's athletic opportunities.

 

(3) DESIGNATION OF ATHLETIC TEAMS OR SPORTS.-

(a) Interscholastic, intercollegiate, intramural, or club athletic teams or sports that are sponsored by a public secondary school or public postsecondary institution must be expressly designated as one of the following based on the biological sex at birth of team members:

1. Males, men, or boys;

2. Females, women, or girls; or

3. Coed or mixed, including both males and females.

(b) Athletic teams or sports designated for males, men, or boys may be open to students of the female sex.

(c) Athletic teams or sports designated for females, women, or girls may not be open to students of the male sex.

(d) For purposes of this section, a statement of a student's biological sex on the student's official birth certificate is considered to have correctly stated the student's biological sex at birth if the statement was filed at or near the time of the student's birth

 

(4) CAUSE OF ACTION; CIVIL REMEDIES.-

(a) Any student who is deprived of an athletic opportunity or suffers any direct or indirect harm as a result of a violation of this section shall have a private cause of action for injunctive relief, damages, and any other relief available under law against the school or public postsecondary institution.

(b) Any student who is subject to retaliation or other adverse action by a school, public postsecondary institution, or athletic association or organization as a result of reporting a violation of this section to an employee or representative of the school, institution, or athletic association or organization, or to any state or federal agency with oversight of schools or public postsecondary institutions in the state, shall have a private cause of action for injunctive relief, damages, and any other relief available under law against the school, institution, or athletic association or organization.

(c) Any school or public postsecondary institution that suffers any direct or indirect harm as a result of a violation of this section shall have a private cause of action for injunctive relief, damages, and any other relief available under law against the governmental entity, licensing or accrediting organization, or athletic association or organization.

(d) All civil actions brought under this section must be initiated within 2 years after the alleged harm occurred. Persons or organizations who prevail on a claim brought under this section shall be entitled to monetary damages, including for any psychological, emotional, or physical harm suffered, reasonable attorney fees and costs, and any other appropriate relief.

 

Fla. Stat. § 1006.205

Added by 2021 Fla. Laws, ch. 35,s 12, eff. 7/1/2021.

 

 

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